Pelvic Health

Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Let’s Start the Conversation
700 400 Spring Forward Physical Therapy *** Midtworn Physical Therapist

Imagine this: one day you are in the shower and look down to see something that almost looks foreign to you coming out of your vagina. You also have noticed that you leak urine more and have feelings of a pressure feeling in the vaginal area that just doesn’t feel quite right. This scenario may seem crazy, but it is a common narrative I hear as a physical therapist specialized in pelvic health when women have developed a pelvic organ prolapse. Many women do not know what a pelvic organ prolapse is unless they are diagnosed with one, or have learned about the risks of having one through the pregnancy process. It is a condition that is often not talked about among family, friends and colleagues. This is unfortunate because there are many things that can be done to prevent the development of a pelvic organ prolapse, and conservatively manage one that has already developed.…

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Vaginal Tear During Child birth
Severe Tear During Childbirth: Consider Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy
700 400 Spring Forward Physical Therapy *** Midtworn Physical Therapist

Severe Tearing During Childbirth: Consider Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy   Having a baby is considered to be one of life’s largest natural miracles. Taking care of a child is a task that comes with great responsibility, however many mothers should be cutting out time for themselves to reestablish optimal health. Your body goes through a lot of changes during pregnancy and postpartum that are overwhelming enough, and the pressure to re-establish your old body in today’s society can be daunting. One of these changes can be from a difficult childbirth that may result in an obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS). An obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) is a third or fourth degree vaginal perineal tear where the internal and external anal sphincter are injured. In a fourth degree tear, the anorectal mucosa is also involved. This type of injury can have effects on the pelvic floor muscles by affecting their ability to contract both rectally…

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Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy: It’s Not Just About Kegels and Leaking
700 400 Spring Forward Physical Therapy *** Midtworn Physical Therapist

What is pelvic floor physical therapy? Pelvic floor physical therapy can direct treatment to include your pelvic floor muscles that can become dysfunctional from a variety of reasons. These reasons may include but are not limited to pelvic organ prolapse, pregnancy and post-partum, chronic straining, post trauma, pelvic surgery, or hip and back injury. You have three layers of pelvic floor muscles like any other muscles in your body. Good treatment will not focus solely on your pelvic floor muscles and symptoms but determining what drives your symptoms. Sometimes pelvic floor muscle pain or dysfunction can be the result of an orthopedic injury that creates an imbalance and poor biomechanics around the pelvis. What are the signs and symptoms I need to see a pelvic floor physical therapist? Some common symptoms include but are not limited to: Leaking urine with coughing, sneezing, laughing, or athletics Urgency of urination and feelings of rushing to the bathroom.…

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Why Does My Pelvic Pain Cause Erectile Dysfunction?
700 400 Spring Forward Physical Therapy *** Midtworn Physical Therapist

Understanding the Role of Physical Therapy for Male Sexual Dysfunction For men struggling with erectile dysfunction, pelvic floor physical therapy is not the first place men will seek help. Often, this is because there is a lack of awareness on the role that a pelvic floor physical therapist can play in helping to improve erectile dysfunction. Sexual dysfunctions in men tend to increase with age secondary to many factors that can contribute such as cardiovascular issues, cancers, and loss of muscle strength. Physical Therapists are not trained to treat all aspects of male sexual dysfunction, but we do play a vital role in addressing the musculoskeletal components that would contribute to sexual dysfunction in males. Did you know? Pelvic Floor muscle training in males has been shown to cause positive effects on penile rigidity in men with erectile dysfunction. Pelvic floor muscles assist in coordinating ejaculation, and a pelvic floor physical therapist can use tools…

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Urinary Incontinence Menopause
Urinary Incontinence Postmenopause: Tackle the Issue Early On Versus Later
700 400 Spring Forward Physical Therapy *** Midtworn Physical Therapist

Did you know that urinary incontinence has been shown to be related with an increased risk of falls and is the second leading cause of admission into long term care for older women? Osteoporosis, the loss of bone mass as we age can also increase the risks of falls in older women. Being physically active through weight bearing exercise is crucial to prevent progression of osteoporosis and maintain healthy bone mass. However, what if urinary incontinence is preventing you from being as active as you want? The great news is, pelvic floor physical therapy has been shown to reduce urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. In a recent study, 48 women with postmenopausal urinary incontinence were randomized into 12 weeks of pelvic floor physical therapy once per week (treatment group) versus osteoporosis education (control group). The results of the study showed: At 3 month follow up, the treatment group receiving pelvic floor physical therapy…

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Pelvic Pain and Spinning
Sore or Painful Private Parts Post Your “Soul Cycle?”: Understanding Proper Bike Set Up for Pelvic Health
700 400 Spring Forward Physical Therapy *** Midtworn Physical Therapist

With the rise of boutique cycle studios popping up across NYC such as Soul Cycle, Flywheel, and Peloton, spinning has taken off as a popular exercise. People flock to these spin classes for the great music, the amazing cardiac and strengthening workout, and the camaraderie. Cycling can be a great low impact cardio exercise for many people. However, when proper bike fitting is not considered, you may be putting a nerve called you pudendal nerve at risk. If your perineal area, vagina, or penis/scrotum is starting to hurt, especially after your cycling classes, this could be  a sign of a irritation to your pudendal nerve. Your pudendal nerve is a nerve that runs through your pelvis and has three branches: inferior rectal, perineal, and dorsal branch to the clitoris or penis. Irritation to this nerve can cause pain and burning with sitting that is often relieved when lying down. However, functionally this is not ideal…

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Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist
How Does a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist Relate to Me?
700 400 Spring Forward Physical Therapy *** Midtworn Physical Therapist

Picture this: You are a woman 4 months post-partum and your friend Super Sally is begging you to embark on a “get fit” journey with her. You feel enthusiastic about this, because you are eager to feel “normal” again after having a baby. As you begin to work out in the weeks following, you notice some urinary leakage with jumping or during a squat. You may begin to notice hip, back, or sacroilliac pain that starts as an annoyance, but now is disturbing your work. Suddenly intercourse is painful, and you think you must be going crazy. Your vagina may have a “pressure” like feeling at the end of the day or during a workout you can’t quite describe. You start to feel frustrated and wondering why you can’t seem to get back into the shape you once were, so you seek orthopedic physical therapy for your “strange diffuse pain.” Your pain gets better by…

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